Charm

What’s a day in the life of a missionary?

I was inspired by the story of Sis. Charmaine Lector- Villegas or simply Sis. Charm, a loving daughter of Ninong Manny & Ninang Villa Lector. She committed her life to the mission of bringing the gospel to every corners of the earth together with her husband Bro. Goi Villegas.

As a full-time missionary of Couples for Christ (CFC) Global – they are serving now in Nairobi, Kenya for the past five (5) years.

She was the only daughter.

She could have been a corporate honcho and a thriving successful businesswoman but she chose to serve God.

My wife (Jude) was a schoolmate of Sis. Charm in International Philippine School in Riyadh (IPSR).

She transformed from a nurtured OFW daughter into a missionary servant.

I was inspired how they implemented various CFC programs and how they touched lives in the African continent.

Charm

Sis. Charm & Bro. Goi Villegas in action. Ninong Manny & Ninang Villa Lector with the missionary couples (bottom right). Photo credits to the owner of the photos.

Serving a full-time mission is accepting a call to represent the Lord Jesus Christ. It is a joyful experience, but it is also hard work. To be a successful missionary, you must prepare spiritually, physically, emotionally, intellectually, and socially. Effective preparation in these ways allows you to serve “with all your heart, might, mind and strength”.

Are you called to do mission?

We are called to wholeheartedly respond to the mission works of the Catholic church.

According to Archbishop Jose Palma of Cebu,the words of Saint John Paul II during his 1981 visit keep echoing in our ears and enflaming our hearts: “There is no doubt about it: the Philippines has a special missionary vocation to proclaim the Good News, to carry the light of Christ to the nations.” The pope was most emphatic, expressing his profound hope: “I wish to tell you of my special desire: that the Filipinos will become the foremost missionaries of the Church in Asia.” These are challenging words for us to take to heart!

We can be missionary by “sharing and communicating Jesus Christ to others.”

Archbishop Luis Antonio Tagle of Manila shared that we can be good storytellers and we can be good missionaries who proclaim Jesus Christ if we ourselves have first-hand experience of his presence.

“Telling the Story of Jesus” as a way of doing mission.

Salvation history is “the story of God’s love affair with humanity” and all Christians can share in doing the Church’s mission by knowing Jesus’ story and sharing it through our lives.

Tagle said storytelling in order to fulfill the Church’s mission must be told by a credible witness who shows he “knows God” through his words and actions.

Citing Pope Paul VI, he said, “Our age listens more to witnesses than to teachers.”

The story one tells of Jesus’ love defines a person and builds community, Tagle added. “Our stories tell us who we are and what kind of community we are – what stories bind us together.”

There are many ways to tell a story. “Our very persons could be the story of Jesus. That’s how the saints told the story of Jesus.

Tagle said, “Many of us cannot remember Pope John Paul II’s many teachings, but only looking at pictures will remind us of his life and his person. Until his body became bent and when he was almost completely stooped he continued to serve. That’s the story of Jesus.”

If we do not do mission, we are not missionaries of Christ carrying out our pastoral work but we end up as social workers, organizers, event managers, CEO of the Church.

The Mission Society of the Philippines (MSP) serves as the official and chief missionary arm of the Catholic Church of the Philippines. Since its inception in 1965, the MSP now has been working in five continents and twelve countries. In Asia, the MSP has missions in Thailand, Taiwan, Japan and South Korea. In Oceania, it serves in Papua New Guinea, Australia, New Zealand, the Cook Islands, and Tokelau. In Europe, it is present in the Netherlands. In North America, it is present in the United States of America, while in South America, it has a mission in Guyana.

Women and men who are twenty-five (25) years of age and above, and eager to become partners of the MSP mission may join the Fil-Mission Auxiliary Association (FMAA). The FMAA is a nationwide organization, which promotes missionary consciousness in their parishes and dioceses.

However, this organization slowly expands and reaches now to some countries where the MSP is present, like South Korea, and New Zealand. Hopefully, it will soon reach to the United States, England and others.

If you are in the Philippines, you may inquire at the MSP parishes in Mandaluyong City and Cebu City, MSP Mission House in Davao City or at the MSP Central Office in Makati.

If you are living abroad, you may also contact our MSP missionaries assigned near to your areas.

For inquiries, please contact:

MSP Central Office
3791 Cuenca St.
Palanan
1235 MAKATI CITY

PHONE: (632) 551-6983
FAX: local 117
EMAIL: secgen@msp.org.ph