Cross

Today, for Christians, is a special day set aside to commemorate the death of Jesus on the cross. It’s also a day that we can set aside, no matter what religion or spirituality we affiliate ourselves with, and challenge the mystery of the cross. We can be authentic disciples by embracing our hearts and confronting the cross that we personally carry.

On this Good Friday, let us find our cross.

Cross

The Cross becomes a symbol, not of death and degradation, but of self-sacrifice, love, and our ultimate triumph over death. It is the very core of our Christian faith and it is a day we should treasure.

A cross can be embraced, and it can also be forced upon us – against our will. My question to you is: What cross do you carry?

The first cross that some of us bear is the Goat Cross. Some of us are undergoing some painful experiences inflicted upon us by others, as if we were a scapegoat, forced to bear the scars of other people’s sinful actions. As a result of the Goat Cross, we blame our parents, teachers, culture, the church or even our government. If this cross is carried, it frequently ends up in the courtroom.

Another cross is the Crybaby’s Cross. These are those who always say, have pity on me; I need special treatment; make an exception for me for I am a wounded disciple. We find comfort in asking: Do you see the heavy cross I am forced to carry in my life?

We have the Cranky Cross. Because we carry the cross of not finding a job; of being overworked and/or underpaid or the cross of sickness or of family problems, we become angry, bad-tempered, irritable, grumpy and crabby. Those of us who carry Cranky Crosses are crosses to others.

The Cross of Our Humanity is the cross of human nature. We can be stingy, eager to serve and also self-serving, kind and also mean. Such is the nature of the human condition, and often it’s hard to bear!

We further carry the Cross of Others. It’s heavy with sin and mistakes of our family and country. This is a difficult cross to embrace since it is a sharing in government’s guilt and sin. It’s hard enough to embrace our own sins, but to carry the sins of all with whom we are associated including religion, government and society is truly to walk in a saving figure’s footsteps.

There are many other crosses that we bear, but the heart of this reflection is a promise of a new era of justice and peace for all. You and I need to embrace and carry our crosses, to deny our very selves as we surrender to God’s will.

On this Good Friday, embrace your cross with great affection and love. When you do so, you can release from it the power to fertilize and pollinate humanity. Great is the power in each of our crosses to create a new breed of humans, true son and daughters of God.

My prayer for you is the grace to understand and embrace fully your cross on this Good Friday and every other day that you are called to do so.

Source: Good Friday Reflection: Finding and embracing your cross by Elton Letang