I met Ate Wendy Samonte after the closing program of SFC International Conference 2018.

She wore a facemask and thanked a group of brothers and sisters in the parking lot.

Bro. Cris Serdenia, a fellow servant leader in SFC Middle East introduced her to me.

Ate Wendy

Dear Lord, I come before You today in need of Your healing hand. In You all things are possible. Hold my heart within Yours, and renew my mind, body and soul. I am lost, but I come to You with grace. You gave us life, and You also give us the gift of infinite joy. Give me the strength to move forward on the path you’ve laid out for me. Guide me towards better health and give me the wisdom to identify those you’ve placed around me to help me get better. Amen. (Together with Ate Wendy & Bro. Cris.)

Ate Wendy was diagnosed with gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs), a rare type of cancer found in the digestive system, most often in the wall of the stomach.

She undergone surgery in 2016. She has no stomach anymore. Digesting food is a big challenge.

She shared her pains during chemo and CT scan sessions.

I felt her agony because I experienced the same.

Her optimism was a source of inspiration.

She went to the event as a victor and full of gratitude.

The SFC community was a source of hope.

Stories about Ate Wendy gave me a deeper understanding of God’s relentless love.

She was a living witness of God’s faithfulness.

Let us pray continuously for her complete healing.

Amidst her condition Ate Wendy remains steadfast in serving the Lord in whatever way possible, her gratitude prayer:

“Thank you God for being with me, inspiring me and using me to speak Your words to my brothers and sisters. Continue to use me Lord, allow me to see Jesus through the people around me and to experience Your great love.”


Third day of February every year will never be the same again.

A memory of thanksgiving and overflowing graces.

“The biopsy result is out. It’s cancer.” Three (3) years ago, these words from my doctor crashed me into pieces. Looking back to where I am now, I am in awe of God. I could have easily given up but He has a better plan. Bigger than my vision.

The message of the gospel today reminded me to yield more in God’s embrace. (Payakap pa more Lord!) More years of loving and serving Him. Thank you for everything!


God’s love in action. Three (3) years of healing grace. Thank you Bro. Rommel & Bro. Cris for sharing your time. More years of serving and loving the Lord!

Celebrating it with Bro. Rommel & Bro. Cris from SFC Middle East.

#nootherwaybutforward #loved #healed #serviceaboveall


Ututin ka ba?
(Are you passing wind more than the usual?)

As a cancer conqueror, passing wind is like a nuclear atomic bomb that rips off the nostrils of your neighbors?

More often than not, they have a life of their own.

Is it good or bad?

On average people pass wind about 15 to 25 times a day. But sometimes illness, what you eat, and stress can increase the amount of wind you pass.


Gone with the wind? How’s your gas today? (Photo credits to the owner.)

What passing wind is?
Passing wind (intestinal gas) is called flatus or flatulence and is normal for everyone. It is not usually a serious problem or a sign that your cancer is getting worse. But it can be embarrassing, worrying and uncomfortable.

Causes of flatulence
Sometimes cancer or its treatment causes too much gas in the digestive system, making you pass wind more often than usual. Several things can make flatulence worse. These include:

  • eating certain high fibre foods
  • swallowing too much air
  • drinking gassy drinks, including beer
  • smoking
  • lactose intolerance
  • not being able to absorb fat from the intestine

Tips to reduce wind
It isn’t possible to stop flatulence altogether but some things can help to control it.

Try some of the following:

  • avoiding foods that make it worse, such as cabbage, corn, brussel sprouts, onions, beans and cauliflower
  • eating slowly and chewing your food for longer – to reduce the amount of air you swallow and help to break food down
  • activated charcoal tablets or powders – these can also absorb smell
  • eating ginger – this is said to help digestion
  • drinking peppermint tea

You might also find it better to eat 6 small meals a day, rather than 3 large ones. Smaller meals are easier to digest and may produce less wind.

Some medicines can help to reduce wind. Speak to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist about which one may be best for you.

Some processed foods contain ingredients that can cause wind: for example, sweeteners or preservatives.

You can help to reduce wind by cutting out:

  • any foods that contain artificial sweeteners
  • sugar free sweets and chewing gum
  • fizzy drinks

Talk to your specialist nurse or doctor if the wind continues. They may be able to prescribe medicines to help. They can also refer you to a dietitian who will be able to recommend other changes you can make to your diet.

Source: cancerresearchuk.org